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Annex 1 - CM/121/18

(CAMBRIDGESHIRE POLICE) v FORMER POLICE CONSTABLE GEOFF LLOYD

Annex 1 from the Decisions and Reasons on facts and conduct

It is alleged that:

BACKGROUND FACTS

  1. You joined the Cambridgeshire Police on 27th January 2003.
  2. You met Ms A in or around September 2008 when she was involved in a road traffic accident. She was 19 years old. You assisted her in a professional capacity and she expressed her thanks to you by giving you tickets for a theatre performance.
  3. Thereafter you remained in contact with Ms A. Ms A understood that you were in an unhappy relationship and that the relationship had subsequently ended. Contact with Ms A was irregular and non-existent when you were aware that she was in a relationship. You told Ms A that you were single.
  4. In 2013 Cambridgeshire Constabulary sent a warning notice to all officers about inappropriate contact with vulnerable victims. This was re-iterated in 2014.
  5. In August 2015 you forced yourself upon Ms A and had sexual intercourse with her. You were in bed with Ms A. You attempted to have sex with her. Ms A was lying to the side of the bed. Ms A dug her heels into the bed and tried to stop you opening her legs. She moved away from you. You got out of bed and walked around to her. She straightened legs. You said, ‘Well you know what I want.’ Eventually you forced yourself on to her and had sex with her. She did not engage. The next morning you confirmed to her that, ‘You really didn’t want that did you?’ and ‘You made it hard for me.’ You then sent her sister a message in which you said that you thought Ms A had mental health issues.
  6. You were in contact with Ms A via WhatsApp. You sent Ms A images that were connected with your work including:

 a. A photograph of an unmarked Cambridgeshire Constabulary police vehicle. The registration number of the vehicle was both visible and legible, and/or

 b. A photograph of an ambulance incident screen. The details of the patient were both visible and legible – including their name, address, sex and age, and/or

 c. A photograph of Webstorm showing a number of incidents. In this photograph the details of the incident caller can be read; including their names, dates of birth and the reasons for the call, and/or

 d. A photograph of a serious road traffic collision in which the driver had sustained serious injuries.

 

7. You met Ms B in or around September/October 2016 when you were on duty and you attended Peterborough Hospital in relation to an incident. You spoke to Ms B and she indicated that she was interested in joining the police service. You suggested that she join you for a ride-a-long and you gave her your personal mobile telephone number. You also volunteered to assist her with the paperwork for the ride-a-long scheme. You helped her with this and once it had been completed you began to send Ms B text messages asking how she was. You then began attending at her place of work with coffee for her. Ms B opened up to you and discussed difficulties she was experiencing in her private life.

8. You told Ms B that you were single and that you lived on your own. You began to send sexualised messages to Ms B. You also sent her photographs of yourself, including photographs of yourself naked and of your erect penis. Miss B felt vulnerable, depressed and short of confidence. Ms B responded to your messages by sending you photographs of herself.

9.  On one occasion you attended at Ms B’s place of work and you invited her to sit in your car with you. You attempted to kiss her. She rejected your advances, made her excuses and got out of your vehicle. Ms B remained in contact with you as she wished to partake in the ride-a-long.

10. In 2017 the Professional Standards Department published a policy that defined the abuse of position for a sexual purpose as,

11. ‘Any behaviour by a police officer or police staff member, whether on or off duty, that takes advantage of their position as a member of the police service to misuse their position, authority or powers in order to pursue a sexual or improper emotional relationship with any member of the public.’

12. In February or March of 2017 you took Ms B for a ride-a-long. You were on duty, in a marked police car and single crewed. You told Ms B that you needed to complete some paperwork and said that you should have lunch. You drove to an un-manned fire station in Peterborough. There was no-one else there.

13.  At the station you sat at a table to eat your lunch. As you did so you asked Ms B to sit closer to you; which she did. You then asked her to sit on your lap. Ms B thought that this was a strange request and she refused to do so. Ms B believed that you had brought her to the empty fire station in order to engage in inappropriate conduct with her. Following this incident your contact with Ms B was reduced and then finally ceased.

14. On 21 October 2018 you made a disclosure to Ms A that a Polish male had been stabbed to the chest and that he had died in hospital. You knew this was sensitive and should not have been disclosed as you said, ‘For your ears only tho, dear.’

15. You repeatedly told Ms A that she would benefit financially from your retirement – telling her that she would get several thousand pounds from you e.g. on 21 October 2018. In addition you told Ms A that you were targeting her ex-partner, whom you referred to as BBC, you asked for his car registration number. You then purported to conduct vehicle checks on the car confirming that it was registered to Ms A’s address but insured at a different address. You also said, ‘My mission over the next couple of weeks is to make sure the fat bald headed cunt with a red warning light on top of him gets thorough nibbled,’, ‘I’ll do a bit of Qashqai hunting too.’, ‘Did you say BBC will leave the school between half 8 and 9 tomorrow? … Planning my day.’, ‘BBC is a lot more important that an bloody knife point robbery.’

16. On 8 November 2018 you stopped the vehicle being driven by Ms A’s ex-partner. You told Ms A this. You went on that he was ‘white as a sheet, flashing red light on … dazzled my rear reds on the police car … He didn’t try to use your address, tho, but I will be forwarding his new address to DVLA so they can prosecute him.’

17.  Cambridgeshire Police Computer Systems contain a variety of warnings at their login screens. They emphasise the care to be utilised, remind officers of their obligations and the law and that access should be for a policing purpose. You have misused Cambridgeshire PSD Police computer systems to search for individuals including,

 a. C S on 10 August 2012, and/or

 b. C O’S on 6 June 2013, and/or

 c. D A on 16 December 2012, 19 December 2012 and 8 February 2013, and/or

 d. K S on 1 January 2011, 8 August 2011, and/or

 e. S C in January 2018.

 f. N H,

 g. Yourself

 h. (name redacted)

18.  You retired in December 2018.

 

Particulars of Misconduct

It is alleged that you have breached the Standards of Professional Behaviour and in particular the standards relating to:

(1) Honesty and Integrity In that you acted without integrity and/or abused your position as is set out at paragraphs 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 13 and 15 above. Your behaviour as set out in the Particulars of the Allegation and above has breached this Standard.

(2) Confidentiality In that you failed to treat information with respect and that you accessed and/or disclosed it as is set out at paragraphs 6, 14, 15, 16 and 17 above.

(3) Performance of duties In that you failed to perform your duties diligently as set out at paragraphs 6, 7, 13, 15 and 17 above.

(4) Orders and instructions in that you failed to abide by Cambridgeshire Police’s policy and the Data Protection Act as set out in paragraphs 6, 14, 15, 16 and 17 above.

(5) Discreditable Conduct In that your behavior as set out in the Particulars of the Allegation and Particulars of Misconduct have discredited the police service and/or undermined public confidence in it.

It is alleged that these matters individually and/or collectively amount to gross misconduct, namely a breach of the Standards of Professional Behaviour that, if proved, is so serious that your dismissal would be justified.

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